DID YOU KNOW

2017

Educating America During Mental Health Month

Risky Business Logo

May is Mental Health Month, and this year, Mental Health America is educating people about habits and behaviors that can increase the risk of developing or exacerbating mental illnesses, or even could be signs of mental health problems themselves. Risk factors include risky sex, prescription drug misuse, internet addiction, compulsive buying or excessive spending, marijuana use and excessive exercise. If you know of someone who engages in these risk factors, May might be a good time to let them know about Mental Health America and its Risky Business toolkit for help.

Preventing Child Abuse By Identifying Risk Factors

nvfs
Age and poverty are two of the top risk factors for child abuse, according to long-time 100WomenStrong grant recipient, Northern Virginia Family Service (NVFS). The group, through its Healthy Families Program, works to halt child abuse and neglect, as well as to prevent its occurrence in the first place. To help you and others recognize and intervene, Healthy Families shared the following leading risk factors during National Child Abuse Prevention Month:
 

Age: In cases of neglect, younger children are more at risk because they are less likely to be able to defend themselves, speak up for themselves or remove themselves from harm’s way. In cases of sexual abuse, risk increases with the child’s age.

Learning disability, congenital anomaly, or chronic or recurrent illness: Challenges such as these make physical and emotional abuse and neglect more common.

Poverty and/or financial hardship: High stress takes a severe toll on parents’ ability to tolerate frustration. In addition, working long hours — a common result of working multiple jobs — can impede parents’ awareness of their child’s emotional well-being or whether there is abuse occurring when the child is under someone else’s care.

Another family member is experiencing domestic violence: In 30 to 60 percent of families where spousal abuse takes place, child maltreatment also occurs.

You can help children in your community:

  • Be a friendly face and a source of encouragement for children in your neighborhood.
  • Offer to babysit for a neighbor or friend, especially if they seem stressed. All parents need support.
  • Become a mentor— formally or informally — to a child or to another parent.

Reporting abuse when you suspect it is the primary way to combat child abuse.

Loudoun County Agencies & Nonprofits Highlight Area Needs and Outline Recommendations for Child Abuse Prevention Month

Scan resilient

April is national Child Abuse Prevention Month, and area nonprofits and county agencies are putting the focus on ways to detect and intervene on behalf of area children. This is an important initiative, given that between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015, there were 1,355 children involved in valid cases of child abuse and neglect in Loudoun County. A report spearheaded by 100WS grant recipient Stop Child Abuse Now (SCAN), highlighted dichotomies in Loudoun County – such as median household incomes that are more than double the national average, while one out of 25 school-age children in the country lives in poverty. Called Resilient Children, Resilient Loudoun!, the report was created by the Loudoun County Partnership for Resilient Children & Families Steering Committee, which includes 100WomenStrong grant recipients HealthWorks, INMED Partnerships for Children, Inova Loudoun Hospital, Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter (LAWS) Loudoun Child Advocacy Center, and county agencies and public service organizations. They explored the changes that have taken place that are impacting families and explored recommendations for how to:

  • Increase community outreach to underserved and isolated families in Loudoun County;
  • Make supports and services more accessible to parents;
  • Improve and increase reporting of children in danger of abuse or neglect; and
  • Increase funding and support for Loudoun County human service providers.

 

 

 

County’s Healthy Status May Mask Needs

58dd602696452.image
Loudoun County is Virginia’s healthiest county, according to The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s most recent annual rankings. Researchers looked at quality of life, including self-reported claims of poor health on state-based surveys, reports of low birthweight to a national registry and data on the rate of deaths prior to age 75. While this shines a light on another positive about our county, there are still many residents who experience hunger and homelessness, as we have learned from the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties’ Faces of Loudoun campaign. Luckily, many area nonprofits, including 100WS grantees HealthWorks and Loudoun Hunger Relief, are working hard to create better quality of life and health in Loudoun.

Children who experience hunger before age 4 lag behind their peers for years

npr_science_foodproblems_004_custom-ff826ce3c8d4e9699492025977ba89ee9234ba3e-s800-c85

A recent study on hunger shows that a hungry child suffers for years after experiencing the hunger. It also suggests that children who experience food insecurity early in life are more likely to lag behind in social, emotional and to some degree, cognitive skills when they begin kindergarten. In fact, the younger the children were when the family struggled with hunger, the stronger the effect on their performance once they started school. For example, children who suffer food insecurity at 9 months old were more likely to have lower reading and math scores in kindergarten than 9-month-olds who didn’t experience food insecurity. Published in the recent Child Development journal, the study reinforces prior research that has shown that children who enter kindergarten behind, stay behind and do not catch up. Food insecurity affects an estimated 13.1 million children live across the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The effect of food insecurity lasts a lifetime.

Homelessness A Reality for Many Community College Students

Xavier-McMillon-300x219

Homelessness and hunger among college students is widespread. It exists in all regions of the country and is not isolated to urban or high-poverty areas, according to a new study of more than 33,000 students at 70 community colleges across the country. The researchers found that 14 percent of respondents were homeless, and one in three were going hungry while pursuing a degree. To make it worse, they found that nearly a third of the students who were going without food or shelter did hold jobs and/or received financial aid. In tandem, many school administrators and policymakers presume that because community colleges cost a fraction of most four-year universities, the costs are easily covered.

Why Pre-K Education Could Be One of the Best Ways to Reduce Crime

cpstest-f4814f69

The return on investment in high-quality early-childhood education has as much as a 13-percent return in terms of better education, health and social and economic outcomes for the children who receive it, according to the Heckman Equation’s Lifecyle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program study. According to their findings, the biggest “chunk of the return on investment” is a reduction in crime, especially for males. Learn more about the ROI of early childhood education here.

Impoverished Children Often Grow into Adulthood with Both Physical and Psychological Problems

images-4

Research shows that poor children grow up to have a host of physical and psychological problems as adults, according to research from Cornell University and others. Cornell’s study – which lasted for 15 years – showed that impoverished children in the study had more antisocial conduct such as aggression and bullying, and increased feeling of helplessness, than kids from middle-income backgrounds.   However, early intervention to prevent some issues associated with poverty could help. Read the full article, including some potential solutions from Cornell’s researchers, here.

2016

Changing the Conversation about Poverty and Inequality:  It Starts With Compassion and Kindness

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. – Aurora Paltt a cafeteria worker at Tarawa Terrance II Elementary School serves a child a lunch here July 11. Preschoolers to 18-year-olds can get a free lunch from Department of Defense Dependent Schools at Tarawa Terrance II Elementary School and Brewster Middle School. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brandon R. Holgersen)

Excerpts from an opinion piece by Karen Weese (Salon)

Fifty-seven percent of the families below the poverty line in the United States are working families with jobs that just don’t pay enough. They are childcare workers, janitors, house cleaners, lawn-service workers, bus drivers, hospital aides, waitresses, nursing home employees, security guards, cafeteria workers and cashiers. They are the people who keep society humming along for everybody else.

In addition to low wages, they often don’t garner much respect and are treated as replaceable, invisible or both. For example, Princeton University researchers showed two groups the same video of a little girl answering questions about school subjects. They told the first group that her parents were affluent professionals and told the second group that she was the daughter of a meat packer and a seamstress. The girl performed at grade level, answering some questions correctly and missing others.  When asked about her performance, the group who believed she was wealthy felt she had performed above grade level.  The second group, which believed otherwise, felt she had performed below grade level.

Sometimes we see what we’re looking for …and what we’re looking for changes based on the context.  There are many prescriptions for combating poverty, but we can’t even get started unless we first examine our assumptions, and take the time to envision what the world feels like for families living in poverty every day.”

 

Compassion is a skill that we get better at with practice.”  Karen Armstrong, Theologian

Deputies Train to Spot Mental Disabilities to Avoid Tragedies

lcsd-8-092616_edit-2-800x445

More than 60 percent of Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office employees – from dispatchers to deputies –have received Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training to help them to spot a person with mental disabilities, from autism and post-traumatic stress disorder to traumatic brain injury. CIT helps them to better communicate and possibly de-escalate situations before they can become violent. Training included site visits to Inova Loudoun Behavioral Services, the homeless shelter,  past 100WomenStrong grant recipient Paxton Campus, and other locations.  Read the article here.

Living in America’s Wealthiest and Happiest County Can Create Additional Pressures For Teens

Suicide Prevention Crowd

Along with living in one of the best areas in America comes very high expectations for residents, including the “peer pressure” to keep up with wealth and success of friends and neighbors. This push for perfection is creating additional stress for Loudoun teens, according to Loudoun County Public Schools’ supervisor of diagnostic and prevention services, and may be contributing to our county’s high teen suicide rate. Parents, teachers and administrators recently met to discuss strategies to mitigate this stress and help children and teens develop higher self-esteem and better coping skills. The school district is drafting a strategic plan for suicide prevention and overall student safety that will include school-based mental health services and will address suicide prevention, bullying prevention and behavior intervention.  Read more here.

Education Foundation Raises $100,000+ at Golf Tournament

2016lefgolftourfrtpge

The Loudoun Education Foundation (LEF), a 100WS partner and grant recipient, recently raised a record $105,000 at its annual Golf Classic. Close to 40% of the funds raised will go directly to teacher classroom grants,. The tournament is LEF’s biggest fundraiser and helps the nonprofit fulfill its mission to enhance the quality of education in Loudoun County Public Schools by supporting projects that stimulate students’ curiosity and create exceptional learning opportunities.  Read more here.

Loudoun Board of Supervisors Looking to Ease Restrictive Affordable Housing Program

hart-800x445

Loudoun County’s Affordable Dwelling Unit (ADU) program has conflicted with state and federal standards for years, effectively shutting area developers out of affordable housing grants that would make it easier for them to build more affordable housing for future residents. In fact, 100WS grant recipient Windy Hill Foundation research shows that it has received the only funding that Loudoun has been awarded in housing grants since 2006, and this was less than 5% of the total funds awarded to Northern Virginia/DC suburbs. Luckily for affordable housing proponents, the Board of Supervisors has agreed to look to amend county regulations to take advantage of millions of dollars offered by the Commonwealth and federal government programs.  Read more here.

Did you know? More than 6 million kids are missing 15 days or more of school a year.

absence2_slide-640a2b607cc6923b75e4042b5e094e64d9fbcb73-s800-c85

Chronic absenteeism rates are highest in high school: more than 2 million high school students are missing 15 days or more. The figures for minority students are even more alarming: More than 20 percent of black high school students are chronically absent. It’s 20 percent for Latino high school students and 27 percent for American Indians and Native Alaskans.

Source:  http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/06/10/480181439/more-than-6-million-u-s-students-are-chronically-absent

Grant Recipient Providing Over 40 Years Of Unique Therapy

ltr-loudouner_Hores

August 9. 2016  Loudoun Times-Mirror

100WS grant recipient Loudoun Therapeutic Riding (LTR) has long partnered with Loudoun County Public Schools (LCPS) to ensure that students with special needs have therapeutic riding opportunities. LTR’s equine-assisted activities and therapies have helped LCPS students and area residents with disabilities or special needs build self-confidence, improve concentration and increase core strength, balance and joint mobility for more than 40 years. 

Community Foundations And Their Benefits Explained

_8866238

What is a community foundation? The short answer: a not-for-profit, grant-making organization existing for the benefit of the residents in a given area.  Community foundations also obtain and share information about needs in the community and identify charitable organizations who might best help fulfill those needs. 100WS is a component fund of Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties (CFLNFC), which also helps us conduct due diligence on grant applicants and more. 100WS donors also benefit from fully qualified tax deductions because of our relationship with CFLNFC.

Inova Loudoun Is In The Top 5% Percent For Nursing Excellence

inovalogo-1-e1470766684853-300x139

Congratulations to the nurses of 100WS grant recipient Inova Loudoun Hospital for earning Magnet status, the highest institutional honor awarded for nursing excellence, for the 3rd time! Approximately 5 percent of 6,000 hospitals in the U.S. earn the designation, which is a rigorous process involving accreditation, from the American Nurses’ Credentialing Center.

Decrease in Homeless Numbers Doesn’t Tell the Whole Story

homelessperson

June 5, 2016  Loudoun Now
Loudoun County has fewer permanently homeless than it has in a decade, according to a recent “Point in Time” count. Many say it shows the County’s progress in the area of housing and shelter, much of it resulting from a coalition of area agencies working together to create “permanent supportive housing units” for chronically homeless. However, while permanent homelessness is down, Loudoun County Public Schools says the number of “precariously housed” in our county has grown.  

Visualizing Future Success

graduation

June 2, 2016  Loudoun Times-Mirror

Graduation can seem a really long way off for a fifth grader, and in at-risk neighborhoods, it may seem impossible. To help make graduation a concrete possibility for its students, Sterling Elementary School invited Park View High School graduates to parade through hallways in their caps and gowns to inspire younger students. Many schools across the nation have started these parades to encourage elementary school students to visualize their own success in school and stay positive about their educations.

Girls Beat Boys In 8th Grade Tests

June 1, 2016

About 21,500 eighth grade students from over 800 public and private schools participated in a technology and engineering test administered by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. The results highlighted a persistent educational gap between students in wealthier communities and suburban areas, who did better than those from poorer communities and cities. The test also showed that: 

  • For the first time, girls on average scored better than their male peers.
  • Students who participate in activities outside of school focused on design and systems, such as a robotics club, or tinker with design concepts on their own scored higher than those who did not.
  • In-school learning related to technology and societal issues was associated with higher scores.
  • Students who believed they had the abilities to do various technology- and engineer-related tasks did better than students who did not.

Six High School Seniors Awarded For Perseverance

highschoolseniors

May 27, 2016  Loudoun Times-Mirror
Six Loudoun County High School students who “Beat the Odds” recently were awarded a combined $22,500 from the Loudoun Bar Association. This is the 12th year that the Loudoun Bar has supported area youth who have  overcome major life obstacles and thrived. Since 2005, the group has awarded more than $130,000 to 49 students.

Thanking Volunteers During A Special Week

April 10, 2016
It takes the hard work and dedication of thousands of volunteers to make it possible for Loudoun County nonprofits to serve those in need. April 10-16 is National Volunteer Week – take a moment to thank your favorite volunteer this week!  Click here.

More Tax Dollars May Go to Nonprofits

March 9, 2016  Loudoun Now
Loudoun County is now accepting grant applications from local nonprofits in four areas: hunger and homelessness mitigation, emergency services, health and related services, and recreation and culture. With competition on the rise, some are hoping that funds will increase. Read more here.

Pediatricians Urged To Join War On Poverty

doctor

March 9, 2016  usnews.com
The American Academy of Pediatrics is urging doctors to “screen for poverty” by asking the parents of their patients if they are having trouble making ends meet and following up by asking if they have adequate food, housing and heat. Why? Because children are highly vulnerable to chronic stress that results from the emotional and economic burden created by poverty and can  resort to risky behaviors, including smoking, excessive drinking and substance abuse. Poverty also can alter brain function, affect immune and psychiatric disorders and has been linked to asthma and obesity. The aim with this more holistic approach is to improve public health outcomes in children. . . read more.

ELL Student Population Growing Quickly

February 23, 2016  Loudoun Now

Did you know that the number of resource-intensive students like English Language Learners and poorer students has grown much faster than the student population at large in Loudoun County? The number of “economically challenged” students, grew by 109 percent from 2008-2015, according to Loudoun County Public Schools. In comparison, during this same time frame the student population at large has grown 33 percent.  Read more here.

Vets Get New Housing

Vet

February 19, 2016   Loudoun Now
New homes for military veterans wounded in battle is the goal for Hero Homes in Loudoun County. The group, which aims to build five Hero Homes in the near future, was inspired by a national group that built a home for an Iraq War veteran in Lovettsville last year. Hero Homes plans to build in Purcellville. Read more here.

Collaboration To Create Housing Solutions

January 2016
More than 150,000 families in the Greater Washington region are currently in need of affordable homes, a number that is expected to double in less than 10 years. To find solutions that will put more people in affordable homes, dozens of  public and private sector leaders have been meeting since 2014 to examine the lack of affordable housing in the area and its effect on economic growth. Click here to read their findings.

Supporting Affordable Housing

January 2016

Creating affordable housing in the Greater Washington region can help the entire economy, stabilize families and support growth in the area. You can get involved by investing in Our Region, Your Investment to support the production and preservation of affordable homes.  Read the brochure here.

Zoning Ordinance Supports Affordable Housing

January 21, 2016  Loudounchamber.org
Our Board of Supervisors and the Loudoun County Chamber understand how important affordable housing is for the future of Loudoun County. In December, Supervisors approved a zoning ordinance change – supported by the Chamber – that could make millions of dollars of state and Federal funding available for constructing more affordable housing here.  Read more here.

Collaboration To Create Housing Solutions

January 2016
More than 150,000 families in the Greater Washington region are currently in need of affordable homes, a number that is expected to double in less than 10 years. To find solutions that will put more people in affordable homes, dozens of  public and private sector leaders have been meeting since 2014 to examine the lack of affordable housing in the area and its effect on economic growth. Click here to read their findings.

Supporting Affordable Housing

January 2016

Creating affordable housing in the Greater Washington region can help the entire economy, stabilize families and support growth in the area. You can get involved by investing in Our Region, Your Investment to support the production and preservation of affordable homes.  Read the brochure here.

Nonprofits Employ the Best

There are more than 1.5 million nonprofit organizations in the United States.
Nonprofits employ more than 10% of the American workforce and represent roughly $1.65 trillion in annual revenues.
And they have an estimated 20 million individuals leading these organizations who are among the most influential, dedicated and connected leaders.
Source:  standforyourmission.org

2015

One to the World Project Celebrates Community


The concept of community and community helpers are a big part of the LCPS kindergarten first-semester social science objectives, and t Evergreen Mill Elementary, kindergartners learned that ‘community’ can be your home, school, town, state or even country. Students in Jane Stockton’s class decided to help their community by making and donating 25 blankets to Mobile Hope as part of the One to the World project.

Loudoun County Launches New Homeless Prevention Program


December 4, 2014
Funded through Virginia’s Department of House and Community Development, the program will be administered locally by the Dept. of Family Service. If eligible, assistance includes help paying security deposits, utilities, and rental arrears. Read more.

Full Day Kindergarten Discussions

December 4, 2015  Loudoun Times-Mirror

At a recent meeting of state legislators, school leaders and students, discussion surrounded creating ways to build students’ competencies in critical thinking, communication, creativity and the ability to use those skills in society as a whole rather than focusing on teaching to a test. Across the state, legislators are hearing that school districts want to have more control over designing standards and accountability to help prepare students.

Fundraiser’s Success Not Trivial

December 1, 2015

The first-ever Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties (CF) Trivia Night was a resounding success! The brainchild of 100WS member and CF President Kirsten Langhorne raised money for local charities including past 100WS grant recipients All Ages Read Together, LAWS, HealthWorks and Loudoun Volunteer Caregivers, among others. A sizable contingent of 100WS joined the fun to test their knowledge of trivia while raising money for local charities and supporting the Community Foundation at this inaugural event!

Fighting Absenteeism in Schools

November 4, 2015

Chronic absenteeism is a problem for many schools. Students who miss just two days a month will fall behind, which can eventually mean dropping out of school. One educator found combating chronic absenteeism, which can be a mix of truancy, illnesses and family problems, is easier when parents are involved in a child’s education.  

​Loudoun Interfaith Saving for the Future

relief

December 3, 2015  Loudoun Times-Mirror

100WomenStrong grant recipient, Loudoun Interfaith Relief, has received rent abatement for its warehouse space on Miller Drive in exchange for the organization vacating the space in 2020 rather than 2023. LIR Executive Director Jennifer Montgomery thanked Loudoun Supervisors for the action and said it will allow the nonprofit to save money toward its future home. 

Loudoun Therapeutic Riding at Morven Park for the Long Haul

October 30, 2015  Leesburg Today

Thanks to the Westmoreland Davis Memorial Foundation, former past 100WS grant recipient Loudoun Therapeutic Riding has the opportunity to stay at Morven Park in Leesburg for up to 90 more years and even build new facilities. LTR offers riding lessons to people aged 3 years and older to help with a wide variety of diagnoses, such as autism, cognitive disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome, and traumatic brain injuries.  For more information on LTR, visit www.ltrf.org.

Real Food For Kids Held First ‘Food Day’ at Sully Elementary School

October 28, 2015 Loudoun Times Mirror

In an effort to bring more healthful food choices into school lunches and to address the link between physical activity, healthy eating and academic performance, Real Food for Kids partners with school nutrition services to create better food choices. At recent Food Day in Loudoun County, Sully Elementary students learned Zumba, watched a chef create a salad, and learned bike and helmet safety.

Windy Hill Coordinator Encouraging Self Sufficiency and Improvement

October 2015 Middleburg Times

The Windy Hill Family Programs Coordinator is focused on helping community residents, especially students, learn self-sufficiency and the value of effort. Thomas Garnett, who moved to the United States from Liberia, is working hard to develop strong educational programs for students who live there as well as creating a “family” environment for residents. Learn more about Garnett and his programs here. 

​Early Intervention for Food Insecure Children

doctorkid

October 23 2015

Children in food insecure households get sick more often, recover more slowly from illness, have poorer overall health and are hospitalized more frequently.  Pediatricians will start asking questions such as:  “Within the past 12 months, the food we bought didn’t last, and we didn’t have money to get more. Yes or No?” to identify and help those who are potentially struggling with malnutrition. Read the full article.

Crisis Intervention Team Created

More than 1700 people suffering a behavioral crisis have been assisted by Loudoun County Sheriff’s deputies in recent years. The new Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Assessment Center increases immediate access to crisis psychiatric evaluations and minimizes the time law enforcement is pulled from community policing duties.  

LCPS Expands Full Day Kindergarten

September 17, 2015  Leesburg Today

Many are concerned about Loudoun being one of only three counties in the Commonwealth to not offer universal full day kindergarten (FDK).   It is now offered at 35 of the county’s 58 elementary schools (or 31% of the county’s 4,880 kindergartners).  While others are concerned about prioritizing FDK ahead of other programs or overall costs, political momentum in support of FDK is growing. 

Will Loudoun students do better in school when they start the day on a full stomach? 

Sugarland_Breakfast_main

Sugarland Elementary now offers free breakfast to the entire student population, as one step in reducing impediments to learning that are out of the school’s control.  While the program has already resulted in increased on-time attendance, the hope is that it will also contribute to higher achievement in the classroom.   State and local officials will be watching carefully to understand how programs like this will impact classroom performance. http://bit.ly/1OjvKL5

Loudoun Volunteer Caregivers Receives Wibel Foundation Grant

August 21, 2015  Leesburg Today

LVC – a 2014 and 2015 100WomenStrong grant recipient – recently received $15,000 for its assisted transportation, support services and money management programs for elderly, frail, disabled or those who suffer from debilitating diseases in Loudoun County.  

LCPS Sets New Eligibility Thresholds for Free/Reduced Meals

August 19, 2015 Leesburg Today

New criteria should increase number of LCPS students who are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, and families who qualify can get an application at school or at the LCPS main office in Ashburn. 

Nonprofits Working Together

July 31, 2015

Loudoun Chamber’s Non-profit Initiative offers a strategic, collaborative environment to help nonprofits become stronger, learn from one another and build alliances that will help us all create a better Loudoun County.  Learn more here.

Expanding Full-Day Kindergarten in Loudoun County

June 2015  Leesburg Today

Loudoun County is one of only three school systems in Virginia that does not offer every kindergartner a full-day program. But, that is changing. Two more Loudoun elementary schools – Forest Grove and Sterling (both Title I schools) – will offer full-day kindergarten this fall, the latest in Loudoun’s gradual expansion of the program.  Read the full article here.

Supervisors Vote To Give More Than $1 Million To Nonprofits

June 23, 2015  Leesburg Today

Kudos to Loudoun County Supervisors for their vote to give $1 million to 33 area nonprofit organizations. We are excited see that the LCPS Backpack Coalition will receive $5,000 from the county. . . Read more

A Full-Time Minimum Wage Job Not Enough For 1 Bedroom Apartment Anywhere in US

May 28, 2015 Vox.com by Ezra Klein 

There is no state in the union where a full-time, minimum-wage worker can afford to rent a one-bedroom apartment for less than 30 percent of his paycheck (which is a standard measure of housing affordability). . .Read more

Loudoun County Fastest Growing In the State, Again

May 22, 2015 Loudoun Times-Mirror

This just in from the Census Bureau’s American Community 5-year survey for 2010-2014: Loudoun County is experiencing extreme population growth. . .Full article here

Supporting Children in Poverty Through Literacy in Loudoun

February 12, 2015

Sadly, more than 15% of our nation’s children live in poverty. On average, these kids have one or two age appropriate books in their homes, yet a full sixty-one percent of the children in low-income families have no books at all. Recent studies confirm that the availability of reading material is the strongest predictor of a child’s ability to read and later academic achievement, yet millions of at-risk elementary school-aged children are without this basic resource. How can we support these children? Read more.

Study Shows Social Learning Just as Important as Cognitive Skills

Feb 10, 2015 American Journal of Public Health

Educators, take note!  A new study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, finds a strong link between a child’s social and emotional competency in kindergarten to how well they will do in early adulthood. The comprehensive 20-year examination of 800 children in four different cities were tracked from kindergarten through their mid-20s.

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

100WomenStrong is a proud fund of Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties